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DIY Wood Slice Holiday Party Invitations

These are special invitations — ones that you might make for a handful of close friends. They’ll either need to be hand-delivered or mailed in a small box, but the impact they’ll have is worth the extra effort. Similar to my DIY wood Valentines earlier in the year, the painted wood slice can be reused by the recipient as a photo/note holder through the rest of the year.

DIY Wood Slice Holiday Party Invitations

Supplies

Wood Slice Invitation Supplies

Instructions

  • Begin by taping off a section of your wood slice to be painted. I sectioned off about a third of each circle and filled in with gold paint. If your tape is wide (like mine), you can rip it down the middle, since only one straight side is needed. Be sure to press down firmly to keep paint from getting under.

Making Wood Slice Invitations

  • Acrylic craft paint dries quickly, and you’ll be ready to peel off your tape and start on another section in as little as 20 minutes.

Taping Off

Peeling Off the Tape

  • I tore my tape down the center again, then used the straight sides to make skinny stripes. I made sure to overlap one or both of the other colors with each stripe.

Making Wood Slice Invitations

  • The mini clothespins can be attached with a thin layer of white glue. Let them dry, then clip your invitation to each wood slice and you’re done.

Finished Wood Slice Invitations

Wood Slice Invitations: We're Going on a Sleigh Ride!

This would be such a delightful invitation to receive! And long after the party is over, the recipient could reuse the wood slice to display photos, notes, or holiday cards.

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scotchblue, scotchblue painter's tape, painter's tape, painting

 
 

This post is a collaboration with ScotchBlue™ Painter’s Tape, but all words and opinions are my own.

A New Video Series with Painting Tips

I’m so eager to get some paint on the walls of the new house. I’m fine with taking my time to make decorating decisions, to place everything and unpack all of the boxes… but come on. I want to pick up a paint brush already! Eleanor’s room is on the docket and I’ll share her color choices later today, but first I have some how-to videos to share that might be helpful for those of you about to paint.

Lindsay Ballard of Makely Home writes for Glidden on My Colortopia (as do I), and they put together a video series of helpful painting tips. The trickiest thing, I think, is to cut in without using painter’s tape.

I’ve tried to explain a lot of this before in writing, but a video is much easier to learn from! There are tips for using painter’s tape in Lindsay’s series too, along with prepping, cleaning up, painting trim, and more. You can check out all of the videos right here, on YouTube.

I have been sponsored by Glidden® brand paint to write this post but the thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

Photography Classes in Chicago

This post is sponsored by Bing.

Earlier this year, I wrote that I wanted to take a photography class, and that Bing was working with me to help ‘Bing it to Life.’ I searched for and found a few photography classes in Chicago, and then chose one with help in part from Bing’s social search functions, and also from the comments on this post.

The class I chose was Intermediate Digital Photography at Chicago Photography Center, taught by Arnold Klein (who took these fun photos of me). I enjoyed it, but when I had signed up, I waffled between choosing an intermediate or an advanced class. Turns out I probably should have gone for the advanced one. The intermediate lessons were a good review for what I’d already learned elsewhere, but I didn’t pick up a lot of new information. I want to stress that this had nothing to do with the teacher though! Arnold was great, but to give you a sense of the class level, many people were continuing from the Fundamentals class and had just picked up a camera two months prior.

I decided to take another class after the Intermediate one wrapped up. I could have gone into the advanced class the next time around, but instead chose Studio Portrait Lighting. It was at the same location, taught by Nolan Wells.

Studio Portrait Lighting Class

Studio Portrait Lighting Class

I learned so much! Rembrandt lighting, soft boxes, spots, grids, umbrellas, distance ratios, strobes, continuous lighting… the works. And while it was focused on traditional portrait lighting, the lessons have been applicable to my everyday photos too. If you’re interested in learning more about photography and light, I’d definitely recommend the class. It was 21 hours of instruction time, plus another 10 or so of in-studio assignments, but if you can commit for the seven weeks, it’s worth it.

I’d taken online photography classes. I’d taken two-hour workshops and an all-day video class. I’d read books and learned as much as I could on my own, but the in-person classes have been the most beneficial. Thanks, Bing, for helping make this happen.

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