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Put the Kitchen Door to Work

Here’s a little storage trick that works for us. I added hooks to the back of our kitchen door to keep all of our bibs, reusable shopping bags, and a couple of aprons. We also keep one tote there to act as a laundry bag for the bibs and dish towels that need to be washed. We almost always keep the door to the kitchen open, which means the side with the hooks is up against the wall. Everything is accessible, but we don’t have to see it all the time.

Back of the Kitchen Door Storage Ideas

  1. Series One Peg Rail
    So minimal and lovely! So not like the hooks I actually have!

  2. Cotton Canvas Tote
    We keep one large tote to store dirty bibs and dish towels until laundry day. Ours is a grocery store bag that’s not nearly as pretty as this one.

  3. Reusable Shopping Bag
    I keep a few reusable bags in my purse at all times, and store the extras in a pouch on a hook. I like the ones from Envirosax and Baggu.

  4. Woodland Tumble Embroidered Bib
    Bibs are still handy for the kids when we’re having a messy meal.

  5. Dryer-Activated Fabric Softener
    We used to use dryer sheets, but I was pretty excited when Method sent over some of their new softener. It’s good stuff (but we do keep this in the laundry room, not the kitchen!).

  6. Kitchen Apron
    I’m kind of over cutesy aprons, but I love this simple one. Works for men and women.

Of course, that was the magazine-perfect fantasy version. Since owning a single beautiful bib isn’t actually practical, our door really looks like this.

Put that kitchen door to work!

(Trivia: That shabby chic bird hook was the first thing I ever bought from eBay.)

Charge!


We used to leave our cell phone (and other) chargers out on the kitchen counter. Drove me bonkers. I finally found a solution that has made a big difference, and it was so simple! You can read about it over at A Brooklyn Limestone, as part of her Junk Drawer Overhaul series.

Arranging a Collection

I’ve shown you how I’ve rearranged my dining room hutch full of white ceramics before, but I hadn’t ever shown my process. So here’s how I do it… I start with the big items first. You can’t shoehorn them in at the end anyway, and if you start with a pleasing arrangement the rest will fall into place.

Obviously I have such a hodgepodge of items that a symmetrical layout isn’t an option for me (though I do love symmetry). I work around that by making sure that the overall layout is visually balanced. For example, see that open lattice-work square in the bottom left? That gets balanced out by the votive holders on the right middle shelf and the scallops of the vintage cake stand on the top left.

I add all the little bits and bobbins that I love at the end. Admittedly they can make the arrangement a little cluttered, so I do edit them down some. Not all of my pieces made it back in, but I tend to rearrange things often so they’ll be back next time.

I love having the built-in hutch to display everything. I wasn’t so sure about it when we moved in, but I’ve since embraced it. I’m still undecided about the beadboard (paint it or leave it natural?), but I’m going to live with it for a while before I choose. It ties in the wood floors and our wood dining set, and the contrast is nice with all of the white. I’ve pinned fabric to the back many times before, so that’s always an option as well. Besides, closing the doors gives the whole thing a bit more polish. Doesn’t everything always look better behind glass?

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